How to Open a Daycare

We have compiled licensing procedures for New York City. Make sure to follow your state’s specific requirements. Regardless this will give you a general idea of what you will have to do Read More »

What Daycare Owners Must Know About Lead Based Paint

The most common cause of childhood lead poisoning is the dust that comes from lead based paint. While lead paint was banned for NYC residential use in 1960, and nationwide in 1978, Read More »

How to Manage Abuse & Molestation Risks – Part 1

Above all else a school’s primary responsibility is to keep their children and teens safe at all times. Unfortunately this is not always the case as during the past few years several Read More »

Proper Insurance Claims Follow Up Procedures Yield Big Dividends for Schools & Non Profits

If you read our first article in the series “Managing Insurance Claims First Reports Can Have Big Impact  for Schools  & Non Profits” then you know that it’s a two part process, Read More »


Where to Start Your Next School in NYC

When deciding where to start your new school, child care facility, or any business relating to children, step number one should be looking at all the demographic data you can get your hands on. Would you rather place a new facility in an area with increasing demand, or decreasing demand? We have included a map below from the New York Times which outlines the fastest growing neighborhoods in the city for children 9 & younger. if you notice, outside of Manhattan the majority of neighborhoods have seen either no change or a decrease in children 9 & younger over the past decade.

Some of the fastest growing neighborhoods include:

  • Battery Park City has grown 129% in the past decade.
  • Lincoln Square Grew 51%.
  • Cobble Hill Grew 31%.
Use this as a starting spot in your research of where to open your new facility.

Major Risk Tip: Child Identity Theft

identity theft

One issue that no one wants to face is identity theft. This year there will be about 10 million victims of identity theft and one third of them will be children & teens. That’s 3.33 million victims! They are considered an easy target because it may take years or even a decade before the theft is noticed. Child identity theft is one of the fastest growing ID crimes, having increased 300% in the past 5 years.

The average child victim is between the ages of 6 & 8. Typically families won’t discover their child was a victim until they apply for a drivers license, or for college loans & credit cards. Think about how often you give out your child’s social security number, or yours for that matter. Doctor’s offices, daycares, schools, & sports teams are just a few examples. If this information falls into the wrong hands damage can be done. The average identity theft results in $12,779 of debt and 44 hours trying to clear up credit.

While you expect hackers to be namesless & faceless, this is not always the case. Many hit close to home. Around 25% of victims claim that friendly fraud was responsible for the theft, meaning a close family member may have used a child’s name & social security number when applying for credit, buying a car, obtaining a loan, etc.

What can be done?
1. Ensure your child is not sharing their information online. Especially their social security number. Do they even need access to it? Young kids are more receptive to phishing scams.
2. Take precautionary measures by only giving out your child’s social security number when absolutely necessary.
3. Enroll in an identity theft prevention program like Identity Guard.
4. Look for the warning signs below.

Warning Signs!
Unsolicited Credit Card Offers – These typically come frequently after a credit inquiry/application has been filed.
Contacted by a collection agency – Must I explain?
First visit to DMV – Unpaid parking tickets?
Credit Applications Denied – Background checks, applying to a job, etc.

If you are a victim
1. Report it to the local police.
2. Call each of your credit card insurers. Get replacement cards.
3. Call the fraud units of the credit bureaus.
4. Keep a log of all conversations with authorities and financial entities. Follow up.
5. File an identity theft complaint with the Federal Trade Commission.

Preventing the Flu & Other Sickness as a Childcare Professional

I don’t have to tell you the flu is a major concern this time of year. If you’ve watched any tv, or known enough people, you’d also know it is particularly bad this year. Let this article serve as a quick reminder of how to prevent it the best you can for your kids. We’ve done our best to include statistics to keep you motivated. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention twenty children have died from the flu this season nationwide.

As you can see below, unless you’re currently in Guam, you’re still at risk for the flu.

1. The single most important thing you can do is hand washing.

How important is it? A study of 305 Detroit students who washed their hands 4 times per day showed 24 percent had fewer colds and 51 percent had less stomach upset. When daycare teachers helped kids wash their hands every morning when they arrived, there were 50 percent fewer illnesses. Surveys say that greater than 50% of both males and females don’t wash their hands after using the restroom. It’s recommended that you wash your hands for at least 20 seconds.

Ok you’ve already lessened illnesses by 50% great job! Let’s keep going.

2. Clean toys, public areas, multiple times per day

Can you clean every inch of your daycare? No its probably not an efficient use of time. Clean the most likely area’s where germs can be transferred. Shared toys, railings, doorknobs, table tops, & bathrooms are prime to hold germs.

3. Enforce policy!

If a child is sick they must go home with their parents. It’s important to isolate sick children from the rest to prevent spreading of germs. Consider the 24 hour rule where even if the child is feeling better they are required to stay home for 24 hours from when they were sent home. This can be difficult for working parents but is important.

4. Educate the parents & children

Only so much can be done on the premises. Children can still get sick at home and bring it with them to your facility. Do your best to educate the parents on what they can do to prevent the flu. The includes at least considering a flu shot.

How to Open a Daycare

daycare 2

We have compiled licensing procedures for New York City. Make sure to follow your state’s specific requirements. Regardless this will give you a general idea of what you will have to do to get a child care center up and running. Procedures for an in-home daycare may vary significantly.

The Department of Health will assign an Early Childhood Consultant to assist you in the process. When the process is finished make sure to contact one of our risk advisors for all your daycare insurance and risk management needs.

Step 1 – Attend a Pre Permit Orientation Session. This will outline the rest of the process.

Step 2 – When you find a possible site for you business, notify Office for PHS inspection

What Daycare Owners Must Know About Lead Based Paint


The most common cause of childhood lead poisoning is the dust that comes from lead based paint. While lead paint was banned for NYC residential use in 1960, and nationwide in 1978, it has never been completely banned for use in commercial buildings. Because of this many daycare services may contain lead based paint.

If paint is peeling, chipping, cracking, or repairs are done unsafely, paint chips could spread easily. Young children can easily swallow lead dust from putting their hands and/or toys in their mouths. Young children are also the ones most at risk for lead poisoning,

Don’t worry though, lead poisoning has definitely declined over the past two decades, and there are precautions you can take to ensure you are safe. The below checklist is used for New York City daycares.

Part 2: 10 Steps to Prevent Sexual Misconduct


This is part 2 of our series on managing abuse and molestation risks. Read part one here on awareness.

Prevention is always the number-one goal with any risk exposure. So please consider the following steps to prevent or at least reduce the likelihood of these events occurring on your premises:

  1. Make sure you have  a Title IX Coordinator (if applicable). *Ask us
  2. You must adopt a “Zero Tolerance” approach regarding any act of sexual misconduct. No wiggle room!
  3. Go through all your organization’s existing training programs, policies and procedures regarding acts of harassment and sexual misconduct. Make necessary improvements while seeking not only to increase management and accountability but rather to set a standard for industry excellence.
  4. Develop and document clear reporting and investigative procedures for allegations.
  5. Develop a comprehensive prevention program with training, education, and awareness for all employees, especially those who provide supervision of children.
  6. Perform background checks on every person who would serve in a role involving children.
  7. Consider a policy of ongoing post-hire employee background checks as well.
  8. Evaluate any past incidents or allegations of sexual misconduct, and identify areas for response or risk management improvement going forward. *Ask us!
  9. Ensure you have multiple ways for the campus community to report possible acts of sexual misconduct or other wrongdoing.

Awareness +Training = Risk Reduction

Part 3 will feature the unfortunate yet necessary guide for how to respond to allegations.

How to Manage Abuse & Molestation Risks – Part 1


Above all else a school’s primary responsibility is to keep their children and teens safe at all times.

Unfortunately this is not always the case as during the past few years several high-profile incidents have rocked the industry. Behind these high profile cases are many other incidents just as terrible that haven’t caught the attention of the national press. Behind those are even more incidents that never even get reported.

No matter the details, any act of this kind, in any sector, will have devastating consequences for both the victims and the organizations involved.

This will be a 3 part series including:
Part 1 – The Wake Up Call
Part 2 – Prevention
Part 3 – Responding

Court Ruling Set To Impact Insurance Costs for Schools & Non Profit Organizations


On Tuesday August 28th, 2012 U.S. District Court Judge Frederic Block ruled the statute of limitations didn’t automatically disqualify a sexual abuse case against Poly Prep Country Day School even as some allegations date back to 1966.  It’s well documented that NY State has one of the countries strictest statute of limitations for sexual abuse and molestation claims.

If the 40 page ruling stands it opens the doors for other potential victims to come forward and press legal action. According to the recent Wall Street Journal article by Sophia Hollander, the case against Poly Prep has been carefully followed as the impact could be wide spread.

Why then do I assert that insurance costs will be impacted? Simple; if insurance carriers begin to see an uptick in sexual abuse & molestation claims, forget merits for a second, just pure cases reported, premiums are going to rise. If the underwriters sense the NY Legislators in Albany will mollify plaintiffs and weaken the statute of limitations, more cases will be open, which will translate into more sexual abuse and molestation claims, which translates into higher losses for insurance carriers. Finally, as insurance carrier’s losses increase they need to raise insurance premiums to off set these losses.

For insurers, and ultimately buyers of liability insurance such as nursery schools, private schools, charter schools, and religious organizations, it’s very difficult to assess the final cost of an abuse and molestation claim. Sexual abuse and molestation insurance claims tend to get their initial reserves set low, and then watch the cost of the claims rise as time goes on. This is called loss development; as time grows so does the cost to administer, defend, and ultimately settle the loss.

Insurance carriers can predict through actuaries the number of sexual abuse and molestation insurance claims they can expect in a given year as the historical data tends to be accurate. If the laws change in favor of the plaintiffs allowing more cases and thus more liability claims to move forward the losses on this class of business will increase, perhaps dramatically. This will move their actuarial tables resulting in higher loss trending and thus the need for more premiums. The carriers won’t wait for the claims to start rolling in to raise rates, it will happen much sooner, perhaps as early as 1st quarter 2013.

There are macro events that happen in the insurance industry that affect both carriers and customers alike in one fell swoop. The key for any nursery school, private school, charter school, religious organization, or non profit is to find line items on their own P&L that they can impact. Our favorite is workers compensation insurance as that is rich in opportunity to lower costs though protocol. For purposes of this article our intent is to simply make you aware of this potential macro trend that may ultimately drive your costs for sexual abuse and molestation liability insurance.